All posts filed under: Pure Vegan

The reddest red

With only few hours remaining till THE new years eve party, it is time to get down with some fundamental thoughts on how to organize the first days following new years eve party. Luckily, this year, I am prepared. For christmass I had the delicious pleasure of enjoying traditional Polish red beet soup. You must know that a traditional Polish Christmass dinner has 12 courses. All of them are either vegetarian or feature fish. And it all starts with a rubby beet root soup J What is the secret of this soup? In order to obtain this marvelous colour you first must pick the right kind of beet root – not the round ones but the tubular ones (they give more colour). Then you must prepare your own fresh, clear vegetable essence, by cooking three ingredients for 2 hours: carrots, parsley root, and celery root. Really cook/boil it. After 2 hours take the pot from the heat and add the cut down beet root (really small pieces), a cut acidic apple and 3 cut onions …

Turning sweet lupin flour into Ravioli

Finding the right filling for your ravioli recipe is definitely both an Art and a Science. There are so many factors one needs to pay tribute to – last but not least the duff of the ravioli needs to fit the taste of the filling… Recently, I came up with a ravioli duff recipe containing sweet luipin flour. In itself the recipe is quite simple. For two people you need: 60g wheat flour (plus some additional one for flattening the duff) 50g sweet lupin flour 30g soft small white beans 2 tea spoons carob seed flour 2 tea spoon salt 100mL water and 2 soup spoons olive oil First, in a cooking pot add the water and salt. Heat untill it cooks and add the sweet lupin flour. Cook the broth for 20 minutes (if some water evaporates that’s fine). Once the time is up, let it cool down to between room temperature or around 35°Celsius (not Fahrenheit ;P ). Add the wheat flour, carob flour, and the white beans (you need to purée them …

Pancakes with mint and red bell pepper – a recipe containing sweet luipines

What to do with the rest of my sweet lupin flour? So far, I‘ve learned to use it in a variety of dishes (e.g. this pancake recipe, or a recipe for pumpkin gnocchi), but mostly as an additive. It does give food a particular taste: albeit bred to be non-toxic, even sweet luipines are slightly bitter. This can be an advantage. An undoubtfull disadvantage of luipin flour is that it tends to boycott the adhesive forces of any duff. That‘s why you usually add it only in very small quantities to e.g. bread enhancing the fluffiness of the baked good. However, there are some ingredients that go well with luipin flour and stick better together. In particular, sweet luipin flour mixes well with beans. While the combination of lentil and luipin flour pancakes is rather difficult to fry, a bean/luipin-based pancake is far easier prepared. Mixing sweet lupin flour with beans instead of lentils has one disadvantage though – lentils have a more dominant taste than beans; the combination of bean and lupin doesn‘t go …

Bed your Sweet Potato!

Simple truth – sweet potato is a very, very delicious food! And, it is so easily tranformed into a delicious meal – the perfect ingredient for a lazy cook! For example – assuming you want dinner ready in 20 minutes (portions for three people) – take 300g of sweet potato (around 2) and 300g of cèpe (a French name for a very special boletus – yellow boletus). Also you need 3 shallots and as much fresh parsley as you want. First peel and cut the sweet potato into thin pieces – around 0.5 to 1cm thin. Put the peeled and cut potato into boiling water and leave it for 3 minutes. Afterwards discard the water and keep the potatoes at the site. Clean the cèpe and cut it. Peel the shallots and cut them as well. In a pan first heat olive oil to maximum until it starts frizzling. Then add the shallots. Reduce the heat to medium and fry the shallots untill they become glazzed. Heat them a little bit more until they start …

Sauerkraut a la Jamaicana

This is unusual for a saukerkraut recipe. But, it’s so good 🙂 Sauerkraut is served with banana and ketchup. Per person you need 1 banana, and 1 to 0.5 cups of sauerkraut (depending on how much you want). Just put some sunflower oil in a frying pan, cut the banana into disks and place them in the sunflower oil. Next, cover the banana with 2 tea spoons of mild curry. Heat the plate and start frying the banana at high flame. In an additional pan, heat the sauerkraut as well in sunflower oil at mid flame.  After 3-5 minutes you are done. Put both on plate, mix it, and add a little bit of ketchup (if you want more, just do it!). It’s a great mix!! And, it is colourfull. As a side dish to this plate,  pancakes out of kidney beans go very well! These are a bit more elaborate to prepare than the sauerkraut, but can be easily stored in the fridge for 1-2 days. Prepare them first before you do the kraut! …

Basic recipe for sweet lupin beans or kernies

Sweet lupin is a legume that only slowly enters the market as human food. Mostly, it is turned into flour first and than used as an additive for a variety of dishes (example recipes can be found here, here, and here). A drawback is that in comparison to its legume relatives, its tastes are rather plain. Therefore, traditional dishes with bitter lupines have them soaked in tasty mixtures of oil and garlic. Prepared in these ways the luipine bean excelles due to its ability to soak in flavours of its surroundings. And, it is this property one should aim to exploit when preparing sweet lupin bean. This method is also easily reproducible with sweet lupines. Cook them (after 2h soaking) for 20-30min in salt water and cover them with a mixture of olive oil, plenty of garlic and some lemon juice. Leave the lupines to soak in the flavours for 2h more hours and serve as a salad with plenty of parsley and onion. In general, the bean will soak in the flavours of any …