All posts tagged: Sweet

Your food measured in sugar cubes

This tastes so sweet – but how sweet? The guys behind the ‘sugar delirium‘-blog created a comprehensive way, that one can easily grasp the sugar content of common foods. On http://www.sugarstacks.com/ they provide pictures of common foods alongside their sugar content counted in the number of sugar cubes. Impressive is how much you eat in a single thanksgiving dinner (see picture). So how much sugar is healthy per day? It is a question hard to answer. On average, an intake of about 30g or 7 cubes of sugar is recommended in the case of free sugar – however, intake of complex sugars bound in some form of whole grain may exceed these measures. Also, the recommended amount varies for different types of sugars, e.g. glucose or fructose. And, recommendations seem to need to be adapted to distinct populations and individuals. Sugar delirium regularly discusses the frontiers of scientific findings regarding sugar intake recommendations. In the meantime, their sugar cube project gives intriguing insights. Have a look on their fruits collection for example. Fruits are often …

Kaki Santa Claus – a Christmass season sorbet recipe (vegan-friendly)

Christmas season started!! So, time to do all these recipes that fit Christmas!!! I’ll start by posting the recipe of a sweet desert (though it is a healthy one). Believe me – it has a fantastic taste! And, it is very easy to prepare. For two bowls, mix one kaki persimmon and one apple (about 400g each) in a blender. Since it is a vegan recipe, it has a chia pudding base. For this, you need to – 3 hours prior to preparing the recipe – mix 2 soup spoons of chia seeds into 150mL water. After 3 hours the liquid should have turned into a kind of gele. Just add the gele (including the seeds) into the blender together with the apple and the kaki. Additionally, add 5 soup spoons of sugar and 50mL of fresh lime juice. If you want to add 2 soup spoons of cinnamon. Attention: cinnamon is a stimulant and may trigger attacks in people with epilepsy. As my sister has it, I never add it into recipes but serve …

The ice-cream “Bavarian Greetings” – a 100% vegan recipe ;)

So, this recipe is very simple and has a surprising mix of ingredients. To serve two people you need about 200g bananas (for a less intensive banana taste and a more intensive red colour, use only a 100g, or unripe banana) 5 soup spoons cassis juice (don’t take sirup, the ice gets too sweet otherwise) AND 1 to 1.5 soup spoons nutritional yeast (don’t take beer, the ice gets too liquid otherwise) Put the banana in the freezer overnight. The next day, put the banana, casis juice, and yeast in a mixer and mix. Ice-cream is ready and can immediately be served. If you only use 100g banana, the ice cream must be stored 4 hours in the freezer prior to consuming. Adjust the recipe as you wish (for example, if you want it sweet you may substitute casis juice by casis sirup). The picture shows the ice-cream with a peppermint and goji berry topping. If you want to store the ice-cream in the freezer for longer, my advice is to mix it with small …

Camel milk on the rise!

Picture I was looking into the camel-milk-producing industries recently, and I was surprised what I found! Here is a little summary of the best highlights: Camel milk makes up only 0.3% of the total world milk production (cow milk constitutes 83.1%), but they are so many products out there! And, camel milk production is growing – more and more products enter the market. Some are just too exotic to be good. For example, around 2009 the first camel milk chocolate was put on the market (I will not name the brand here, but google it and you will easily find it). Camel milk chocolate is a great idea but at the moment the product lives from its exotic status. Trying it I could taste the difference to cowmilk – and it is a great idea to make chocolate out of camel milk. But, the other ingredients (like the vanilla flavor and the melting potential of the chocolate) were not well orchestred. Even though there is (in my opinion) room for improvement, of course other people …

Agricultural Innovation

Where is the limit to agricultural innovation? That‘s what a friend of mine – a Romanian living in the Netherlands who took the picture – recently asked herself. Nowadays, you can buy Pineberries in her local supermarket. Pineberries were of course bred by traditional methods. There are contradicting sources on the web. Some say that Hans de Jongh collected the few remaining plants in 2003 and saved the species from extinction. Other sources say that he himself bred the species further into a commercializable version. Nowadays, pinebeeries are available all over Europe – only 10 years after de Jongh finished his project. They are part of a larger wave of “agricultural innovations” entering the markets. Another prominent example include sweet lupines. Some say this innovations are very needed, other are of course hesitant. In any case the world is on the move.